“Belgium’s performance is dismal and there is no sign of improvement” – Belgium

“Belgium’s performance is dismal and there is no sign of improvement” – Belgium
“Belgium’s performance is dismal and there is no sign of improvement” – Belgium

Belgium continues to deliver dismal performance, whether in terms of competitiveness, economy, health or human development. This is revealed by the “list of lists” compiled each year by the Dutch economist Mathijs Bouman.

In the fall, the Dutch economist Mathijs Bouman draws up his “list of lists” for the Dutch newspaper Het Financieele Dagblad. This year, its list is accompanied by a disappointment: the Netherlands lost their second place, our neighbors to the north having to give way to Sweden. The Netherlands are content with a “good” third place, while Switzerland remains the impregnable number one. The article is always accompanied by a table with the top 15, but in this table it is pointless to look for Belgium. Knack asked Bouman where Belgium stands. His answer pushes us once again to face the facts: we are in 19th place. Nineteenth, just like France.

In the fall, the Dutch economist Mathijs Bouman draws up his “list of lists” for the Dutch newspaper Het Financieele Dagblad. This year, its list is accompanied by a disappointment: the Netherlands lost their second place, our neighbors to the north having to give way to Sweden. The Netherlands are content with a “good” third place, while Switzerland remains the impregnable number one. The article is always accompanied by a table with the top 15, but in this table it is pointless to look for Belgium. Knack asked Bouman where Belgium stands. His answer pushes us once again to face the facts: we are in 19th place. Nineteenth, just like France. For his “list of lists”, Bouman compiled five well-known world rankings. Two of them examine the competitiveness of countries: the World Economic Forum (WEF) Global Competitiveness Index and the Swiss International Institute for the Development of Management (IMD) Global Competitiveness Ranking. This year, the WEF has not published a new ranking; his report was on the economic recovery after the coronavirus pandemic. However, last year Belgium was in 22nd place and the Netherlands in fourth. We are very badly off when it comes to labor market flexibility and the quality of our roads, however, the IMD has established a new ranking. It is a question of taking into account not only precise figures such as unemployment, gross domestic product and public expenditure on health and education, but also more “soft” values ​​such as cohesion, globalization. and corruption. In this list we find ourselves in 24th place, with the Netherlands again in fourth position. Belgium is losing ground compared to other countries in terms of the degree of application of digital technologies by government, businesses and society as a whole. In addition, we seem to be less and less able to develop, attract and retain talent. A third list that Bouman includes in his “list of lists” is the French Business School’s Global Innovation Index. Insead. This index takes into account both input (such as education, research and development) and output (such as patent applications and knowledge dissemination). In this index, we are in 22nd place, the Netherlands in 6th. Although the importance of innovation is often emphasized, we are barely catching up in this area compared to many other countries: five years ago we were in 23rd position. United Nations Human Development Index. This measures the quality of “human development” and examines life expectancy, standard of living, health and education. Here, Belgium comes in 14th position, the Netherlands in 8th. And of course, the United Nations World Happiness Report is also included, “because at the end of the day, it’s about human happiness,” Bouman said. In participating countries, people are asked, using a random test, to rate their happiness in life from 0 to 10. Then we take the three-year moving average and the country with the highest average is happiest. At the bottom of the scale, we find Afghanistan (2.5). Belgium occupies the 20th position (6.8), the Netherlands 5th (7.5), and the Finns first (7.8). Bouman adds up all the lists in a simple way: place on a list counts as a penalty point and the country with the lowest number of penalty points wins. In its calculation, Belgium comes in 19th place, tied with France. Belgium thus gains one place compared to last year. We are overtaking Hong Kong, according to Bouman, probably thanks to the coronavirus and the interference of the Chinese there. But in the “list of lists” we are clearly beaten by the EU Member States: Sweden (2), the Netherlands (3), Denmark (4), Finland (5), Germany (8), Ireland (12), Luxembourg (15) and Austria (16). In almost all rankings, Belgium does worse than these countries, and there are certainly some observations to be made about the way the lists are compiled and their relevance. But if a country consistently scores lower than the countries it likes to compare itself to, and if it has been for years, there is only one possible conclusion: Belgium’s performance is dismal and there is no improvement in sight.

Source

Belgiums performance dismal sign improvement Belgium

 
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