It’s beautiful as the safe haven of rehousing (chronic) – Belgium

It’s beautiful as the safe haven of rehousing (chronic) – Belgium
It’s beautiful as the safe haven of rehousing (chronic) – Belgium

Since Finland rehouses all its homeless, it earns seventy-five million euros a year.

We have no reliable figures in Belgium. As elsewhere, in fact. Because being able to precisely quantify homelessness is impossible. Let’s say that, in our country, every two years, a census is carried out, with the King Baudouin Foundation. The latest, in November 2020 and published in March 2021, mentioned 5,300 homeless people, squatters or people in reception centers in the Brussels Region – an increase of 27% compared to the 2018 census -, 1,870 to Ghent, 500 in Liège, 1,200 in Limburg, 200 in Arlon… In France, the number of homeless people is estimated at more than 300,000. In the United States, the half-millen…

We have no reliable figures in Belgium. As elsewhere, in fact. Because being able to precisely quantify homelessness is impossible. Let’s say that, in our country, every two years, a census is carried out, with the King Baudouin Foundation. The latest, in November 2020 and published in March 2021, mentioned 5,300 homeless people, squatters or people in reception centers in the Brussels Region – an increase of 27% compared to the 2018 census -, 1,870 to Ghent, 500 in Liège, 1,200 in Limburg, 200 in Arlon… In France, the number of homeless people is estimated at more than 300,000. In the United States, half a million must be exceeded, including at least 160,000 in California alone. Initiatives from political authorities, associations or individuals have flourished. In San Diego, some rent vans converted into rooms and their owner, who keeps the ignition keys, moves them every three days, to comply with local regulations. Parking lots have been transformed into reception centres. Tent camps were hastily erected. In Lyon, veterinary students have built Balto, a magicobus that criss-crosses the city to care for the animals of the homeless, often dogs, which most homes do not accept. In San Francisco, Kevin F. Adler founded Miracle Messages, which reconnects homeless people with their families. In Brussels, Alain Maron has drawn up a plan for, in particular, “sustainably relocating six hundred people and families by the end of 2022” thanks to sixty-six housing units divided “into seven projects in seven different municipalities”. The Brussels Minister of Health and Social Affairs recalls that “the cost of supporting a person in housing is four times less than that generated by an emergency bed: five thousand euros per year against twenty thousand!” Echoing this, last month, Les Eclaireurs, Canal+’s new digital medium giving a voice to those who “find concrete solutions for a sustainable daily life”, detailed the Finnish strategy: by relocating its homeless, in nearly thirty thousand social housing units built each year since 2008, the country is “the only one where the streets are empty of homeless people”, increasing their number from eighteen thousand twelve years ago to 4,886 at the last count, in 2019. homeless people have to pay their rent there, therefore find a job, and therefore no longer depend on social assistance or require emergency care. Result: “Since Finland rehouses all its homeless, it earns seventy-five million euros per year”, especially by having reduced its medico-social and psychiatric expenses, its security and surveillance costs, etc. Because, as calculated by Feantsa, the European Federation of National Associations working with the homeless, and as Alain Maron said, “a homeless person who obtains suitable social housing is a saving for the society of fifteen thousand euros. Per person per year.” The return to dignity is a safe haven in this area too.

 
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